Research Separates the Innovator from the Imitator

Nano•E® Research

Posted by Eileen Phethean on

Form of α-tocopherol affects vitamin E bioavailability in Thoroughbred horses J.D. Pagan, M. Lennox, L. Perry, L. Wood, L.J. Martin, C. Whitehouse, and J. Lange Kentucky Equine Research, Versailles, Kentucky 40383,USA     Introduction   Vitamin E functions as a biological antioxidant, preventing the oxidation of unsaturated lipid materials within cellular and subcellular membranes by neutralizing production of free radicals. Supplemental vitamin E may be beneficial in horses experiencing oxidative stress such as during parturition and exercise (Hargreaves et al., 2007) and for horses at risk of certain types of neurological diseases (Mayhew et al., 1987; Blythe and Craig, 1993)....

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EquiShure® Research

Posted by Eileen Phethean on

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EO•3® Research

Posted by Eileen Phethean on

Fish oil and corn oil supplementation affect red blood cell and serum eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentrations in Thoroughbred horses J.D. Pagan, T.L. Lawrence, and M.A. Lennox Kentucky Equine Research, Versailles, KY 40383, USA Introduction Horses require both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diets. The omega-3 family stems from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), while the omega-6 family originates from linoleic acid (LA). Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are intermediates in the formation of eicosanoids that have been shown to reduce inflammatory responses, support immune function, and enhance fertility (Curtis et a~...

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Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy: One Important Cause of Exertional Rhabdomyolysis

Posted by Eileen Phethean on

Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) is a glycogen storage disorder in Quarter Horse-related breeds, warmblood and draft horses that show signs of exertional rhabdomyolysis. A diagnosis should be made by muscle biopsy and identification of abnormal periodic acid Schiff's positive polysaccharide inclusions in muscle fibers. Prevention of tying-up in susceptible horses involves eliminating grain and sweet feed from the ration and adding a fat supplement such as rice bran. In addition, one of the most important factors to prevent rhabdomyolysis in these horses appears to be pasture turn-out and daily exercise. Some laboratories have diagnosed polysaccharide storage myopathy solely on the basis of an apparent increase in muscle glycogen staining. This has unfortunately resulted in the application of the term PSSM to horses of a wide variety of breeds with a variety of symptoms.

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RE•LEVE Research

Posted by Eileen Phethean on

Dr. Stephanie Valberg’s gelding Brooke suffered from RER before his symptoms were alleviated by Re-Leve. Dr. Stephanie Valberg, a researcher at the University of Minnesota, is a world leader in exertional rhabdomyolysis investigations. In conjunction with Dr. Valberg, Kentucky Equine Research created RE•LEVE. Dr. Stephanie Valberg is an international leader in equine exercise physiology research. In particular, she has investigated tying-up syndrome extensively over the past several years. She is presently an associate professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Valberg received her D.V.M. degree from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. In...

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